2.4.11

Street art - creative



The pieces shown on this page are, as far as I can tell, done for the sake of the art, and generally placed in studied locations where they interact with the surface on which they are created (more or less successfully.) They're arranged in the order in which I saw them show up. The crow below is the first I remember.

Monot. The crow was later revealed to be the work of artist Rafik Majzoub

Monot. The fish are possibly his work as well.

Rue du Libam

Monot
 
Saifi. The Sukleen man, who keeps the streets clean and picks up the garbage, is familiar to all Beirut. In this case he's cleaning up more than domestic refuse...

Just around the corner from the Sukleen man and from the same artist, though I don't get the meaning (if any).
(This person is just walking by, not posing)

Tabaris. This one is visible all over the city. I read it as a simple happy symbol,
but it's always possible that in my innocence I'm missing a more devious reference.

Gemmayze

 Fouad Chehab. This one's very interesting as this building is to my knowledge not accessible. Either someone went through a lot of trouble to get in and draw this, or one of the armed men who at some point were posted there was both bored and talented. I got a better look by getting onto the Ring itself, which is level with that floor:


Achrafieh. What is obvious, why is less so.

Off Rue du Liban

Near the Orthodox hospital

Off Bliss Street, a Keith Haring tribute


Hamra

Behind the American University

Hamra and near the American University, a very interesting series of smileys using Arabic typography. I couldn't catch them all in the same spot so I collaged 3 photos. From left to right they mean: "It doesn't matter"; "Eww on you"; "Eat shit"; "Aw come on!"  What detracts from them is their inconsistency: the characters are not all oriented the same way, and they don't respect the baseline, so that they couldn't actually be typed this way which would have been very awesome.

Achrafieh Str. Tribute to Miyazaki

Ain el Mreisse, a lineup representing different emotions.

Hamra